Start Updating activex objects

Updating activex objects

Finally, the term of out-of-date Flash Active X control blocking will end on November 10, 2016.

Unlike out-of-date Java and Silverlight blocking, the following caveats are additionally applicable to out-of-date Flash Active X control blocking.

How out-of-date Active X control blocking will work Anand Khanse is the Admin of The Windows and a 10-year Microsoft MVP Awardee in Windows for the period 2006-16.

He enjoys following and reporting Microsoft news and developments in the world of Personal Computing & Social Media.

For more details, please see the rest of the post below.

Note: Customers running Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 8.1, and Windows 10 are not impacted by this change.

If you want to see what happens when a user goes to a Web page with an out-of-date Flash Active X control after October 11, 2016, you can run this test: You’ll now get an out-of-date Active X control blocking notice when a Web site tries to load an outdated Flash Active X control.

If you need more time to minimize your reliance on outdated Flash Active X controls, see the Out-of-date Active X control blocking on managed devices section of the Out-of-date Active X control blocking topic.

Worse, the malware can hand over the control of your machine to someone else, like a hacker.